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Superior vena cava syndrome and lung cancer: survival and prognostic factors


Journal of Lung, Pulmonary & Respiratory Research
Nesrine Fahem, Asma Migaou, Ahmed Ben Saad, Sameh Jobeur, Saoussen cheikh Mhammed, Naceur Rouatbi

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Abstract

Introduction: The superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS) is a set of signs related to the obstruction of the upper cava current caused by a compression, an invasion or a thrombosis of the superior vena cava. Its etiologies are numerous but dominated by neoplastic causes mainly of bronchopulmonary origin.
Aim of the work: The aim of this study is to evaluate survival and to identify the prognostic factors of superior vena cava syndrome in patients with lung cancer. We also propose to draw up the clinical profile as well as the therapeutic management in SVCS of malignant origin.
Materials and methods: A total of 108 patients with SVCS complicating primary bronchial cancer were hospitalized in the Pneumology Department at Fattouma Bourguiba University Hospital during a period of 25 years.
Results: The results showed the existence of a clear male predominance (98.1%) and an average age of 60.2 years. Smoking was found in 68.5% of cases .The superior vena cava syndrome revealed a neoplasm in 55% of cases and it was metachronous in 30.5% of cases. Median survival was 7months. In univariate study, survival was reduced in patients having general health impairment with Performans Status (PS) score≥2, signs of severity of SVCS, altered respiratory function, chronic respiratory failure, histological type of non small cell lung carcinoma and exclusive symptomatic treatment for bronchopulmonary cancer. Multivariate analysis revealed that gender, smoking, PS score and signs of severity were independent prognostic factors.
Conclusion: The management of the SVCS is multidisciplinary. It requires medical treatment whose effectiveness is still uncertain and radiotherapy which is considered the gold standard of treatment fIntroduction: The superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS) is a set of signs related to the obstruction of the upper cava current caused by a compression, an invasion or a thrombosis of the superior vena cava. Its etiologies are numerous but dominated by neoplastic causes mainly of bronchopulmonary origin.
Aim of the work: The aim of this study is to evaluate survival and to identify the prognostic factors of superior vena cava syndrome in patients with lung cancer. We also propose to draw up the clinical profile as well as the therapeutic management in SVCS of malignant origin.
Materials and methods: A total of 108 patients with SVCS complicating primary bronchial cancer were hospitalized in the Pneumology Department at Fattouma Bourguiba University Hospital during a period of 25 years.
Results: The results showed the existence of a clear male predominance (98.1%) and an average age of 60.2 years. Smoking was found in 68.5% of cases .The superior vena cava syndrome revealed a neoplasm in 55% of cases and it was metachronous in 30.5% of cases. Median survival was 7months. In univariate study, survival was reduced in patients having general health impairment with Performans Status (PS) score≥2, signs of severity of SVCS, altered respiratory function, chronic respiratory failure, histological type of non small cell lung carcinoma and exclusive symptomatic treatment for bronchopulmonary cancer. Multivariate analysis revealed that gender, smoking, PS score and signs of severity were independent prognostic factors.
Conclusion: The management of the SVCS is multidisciplinary. It requires medical treatment whose effectiveness is still uncertain and radiotherapy which is considered the gold standard of treatment for SVCS. 

Introduction:The superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS) is a set of signs related to the obstruction of the upper cava current caused by a compression, an invasion or a thrombosis of the superior vena cava. Its etiologies are numerous but dominated by neoplastic causes mainly of bronchopulmonary origin.
Aim of the work:The aim of this study is to evaluate survival and to identify the prognostic factors of superior vena cava syndrome in patients with lung cancer. We also propose to draw up the clinical profile as well as the therapeutic management in SVCS of malignant origin.
Materials and methods: A total of 108 patients with SVCS complicating primary bronchial cancer were hospitalized in the Pneumology Department at Fattouma Bourguiba University Hospital during a period of 25 years.
Results: The results showed the existence of a clear male predominance (98.1%) and an average age of 60.2 years. Smoking was found in 68.5% of cases .The superior vena cava syndrome revealed a neoplasm in 55% of cases and it was metachronous in 30.5% of cases. Median survival was 7months. In univariate study, survival was reduced in patients having general health impairment with Performans Status (PS) score≥2, signs of severity of SVCS, altered respiratory function, chronic respiratory failure, histological type of non small cell lung carcinoma and exclusive symptomatic treatment for bronchopulmonary cancer. Multivariate analysis revealed that gender, smoking, PS score and signs of severity were independent prognostic factors.
Conclusion: The management of the SVCS is multidisciplinary. It requires medical treatment whose effectiveness is still uncertain and radiotherapy which is considered the gold standard of treatment for SVCS.yndrome (SVCS) is a set of signs related to the obstruction of the upper cava current caused by a compression, an invasion or a thrombosis of the superior vena cava. Its etiologies are numerous but dominated by neoplastic causes mainly of bronchopulmonary origin.

Aim of the work: The aim of this study is to evaluate survival and to identify the prognostic factors of superior vena cava syndrome in patients with lung cancer. We also propose to draw up the clinical profile as well as the therapeutic management in SVCS of malignant origin.
Materials and methods: A total of 108 patients with SVCS complicating primary bronchial cancer were hospitalized in the Pneumology Department at Fattouma Bourguiba University Hospital during a period of 25 years.
Results: The results showed the existence of a clear male predominance (98.1%) and an average age of 60.2 years. Smoking was found in 68.5% of cases .The superior vena cava syndrome revealed a neoplasm in 55% of cases and it was metachronous in 30.5% of cases. Median survival was 7months. In univariate study, survival was reduced in patients having general health impairment with Performans Status (PS) score≥2, signs of severity of SVCS, altered respiratory function, chronic respiratory failure, histological type of non small cell lung carcinoma and exclusive symptomatic treatment for bronchopulmonary cancer. Multivariate analysis revealed that gender, smoking, PS score and signs of severity were independent prognostic factors.
Conclusion: The management of the SVCS is multidisciplinary. It requires medical treatment whose effectiveness is still uncertain and radiotherapy which is considered the gold standard of treatment 

Keywords

smoking, impairment, respiratory, multidisciplinary, clinical, obstruction, extrinsic, patients, impairment, analysis, severity, tumors, lung, cancer, pressure

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