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The effect of detraining on balance and risk of falls in older adults


MOJ Gerontology & Geriatrics
Pietro Bataglin,Clandio Timm Marques,Carla Mirelle Giotto Mai,Lilian Oliveira de Oliveira,João Rafael Sauzem Machado,Jaqueline de Fátima Biazus,Alethéia Petters Bajotto7

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Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the detraining of older adult women who exercise in the aquatic environment. 
Method: A quantitative, retrospective study whose intervention was classified as almost experimental without control group, and the sample was composed of elderly women who exercise in a group in the aquatic environment. The evaluation of the sample counted with anamnesis and the tools Berg Balance Scale (BERG) and Timed Up and Go test (TUG). Two evaluations were carried out at different times, with the first evaluation at the beginning of the detraining period and the second evaluation, three months later, immediately before the participants returned to the exercise group. For statistical analysis the Shapiro-Wilk and Wilcoxon tests were applied. 
Results: The study had 17 elderly women, mean age of 69.23±8.09 years, residents of Santa Maria town, RS. The balance variable remained the same between the two evaluations (p=0,655), that is, there was no equilibrium shortage related to detraining. The risk of falls showed a significant improvement in scores when compared to the 1st evaluation with the 2nd evaluation (p=0,01). 
Conclusion: The results of the study suggest that the dual tasks exercises, performed in the aquatic environment continue to positively influence the variables after three months of detraining.
Objective: To evaluate the detraining of older adult women who exercise in the aquatic environment.
 
Method: A quantitative, retrospective study whose intervention was classified as almost experimental without control group, and the sample was composed of elderly women who exercise in a group in the aquatic environment. The evaluation of the sample counted with anamnesis and the tools Berg Balance Scale (BERG) and Timed Up and Go test (TUG). Two evaluations were carried out at different times, with the first evaluation at the beginning of the detraining period and the second evaluation, three months later, immediately before the participants returned to the exercise group. For statistical analysis the Shapiro-Wilk and Wilcoxon tests were applied.
 
Results: The study had 17 elderly women, mean age of 69.23±8.09 years, residents of Santa Maria town, RS. The balance variable remained the same between the two evaluations (p=0,655), that is, there was no equilibrium shortage related to detraining. The risk of falls showed a significant improvement in scores when compared to the 1st evaluation with the 2nd evaluation (p=0,01). 
 
Conclusion: The results of the study suggest that the dual tasks exercises, performed in the aquatic environment continue to positively influence the variables after three months of detraining.
Method: A quantitative, retrospective study whose intervention was classified as almost experimental without control group, and the sample was composed of elderly women who exercise in a group in the aquatic environment. The evaluation of the sample counted with anamnesis and the tools Berg Balance Scale (BERG) and Timed Up and Go test (TUG). Two evaluations were carried out at different times, with the first evaluation at the beginning of the detraining period and the second evaluation, three months later, immediately before the participants returned to the exercise group. For statistical analysis the Shapiro-Wilk and Wilcoxon tests were applied. 
Results: The study had 17 elderly women, mean age of 69.23±8.09 years, residents of Santa Maria town, RS. The balance variable remained the same between the two evaluations (p=0,655), that is, there was no equilibrium shortage related to detraining. The risk of falls showed a significant improvement in scores when compared to the 1st evaluation with the 2nd evaluation (p=0,01). 
Method: A quantitative, retrospective study whose intervention was classified as almost experimental without control group, and the sample was composed of elderly women who exercise in a group in the aquatic environment. The evaluation of the sample counted with anamnesis and the tools Berg Balance Scale (BERG) and Timed Up and Go test (TUG). Two evaluations were carried out at different times, with the first evaluation at the beginning of the detraining period and the second evaluation, three months later, immediately before the participants returned to the exercise group. For statistical analysis the Shapiro-Wilk and Wilcoxon tests were applied. 
Results: The study had 17 elderly women, mean age of 69.23±8.09 years, residents of Santa Maria town, RS. The balance variable remained the same between the two evaluations (p=0,655), that is, there was no equilibrium shortage related to detraining. The risk of falls showed a significant improvement in scores when compared to the 1st evaluation with the 2nd evaluation (p=0,01). 

Keywords

exercise, postural balance, older adults, double task, physical activity, cardiovascular system, alzheimer’s disease, cognitive deficiencies, elderly population, unsteady gait, muscle weakness, osteoporosis, functional disability, non-communicable disease, heated pool

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